WNW LVG C.VI

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    Joseph
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    WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  Joseph on Sun Dec 18, 2011 7:20 pm

    Here's my latest update, an LVG C.VI by Wingnut Wings of New Zealand.

    This what's finished so far, enjoy Smile :




















    skyhigh
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    Re: WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  skyhigh on Sun Dec 18, 2011 9:10 pm

    Although I saw it in the flesh at the club , still I say Joe that wood effect is Brillant and the engine looks real...... waiting to see it finished for next Exh... cheers

    J.Fenech
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    Re: WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  J.Fenech on Mon Dec 19, 2011 9:13 pm

    Impressive wood effect and engine!! Well done!!

    Ray
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    Re: WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  Ray on Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:27 pm

    Awesome wood & leather effect + that engine really rocks n rolls cheers

    This one deserves a well planned pilot pale

    skyhigh
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    Re: WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  skyhigh on Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:30 pm

    Ray wrote:Awesome wood & leather effect + that engine really rocks n rolls cheers

    This one deserves a well planned pilot pale


    Yes yes agree 101%... cheers

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    Re: WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  Guest on Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:38 am

    Hello, I completely new here.

    The detail on the engine is wonderful. I'm personally working on the restoration of an actual Benz IV engine (as part of a REAL LVG), so i can compare it to the real thing. WNW has done a wonderful job of duplicating the engine.

    I notice that the seat for the observer appears to be a solid wooden seat. There were many versions of the LVG built, but the one that I am working on has an observer seat that is actually suspended by 4 straps, sort of like a swing seat with 4 ropes holding it up. It was done this way to make it easy for the observer to turn around in the deal. He faced forward during takeoff and then turned seat around to observe and operate radio, lower antenna etc.

    I'm NOT in any way saying bad things about the model you are building, just pointing out some differences with actual plane that I know.

    Did you know that the pilot and observer had electrically head flight jackets. Pretty amazing for WWI.

    If you want excellent detailed pictures of a LVG being reconstructed the website of the French group that is rebuilding one is excellent. They do such beautiful work it is hard to believe.

    Keep up the good work.

    Merton Hale


    Joseph
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    Re: WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  Joseph on Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:05 pm

    Thanks for watching and encouraging comments.

    My fault regarding the observor's seat as I took a shortcut and left it as offered by WNW. For reference I am using the windsock datafile and various sites. However I still have a big question on, how the external wind driven generator was fixed to the undercarriage strut, so if you have any good reference please share.

    Today I started spraying the fuselage in preparation for the wood effect.

    Thanks once again.

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    Re: WNW LVG C.VI

    Post  Guest on Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:20 pm

    I don't have any info at the moment on the external generator. I'll see what i can find out.

    Interesting bit of stuff. the antenna that was lowered had at the end of it a big lead weight to make sure it extends down.

    The lead weight (much like you would think of for fishing) had a "wing" on it so that it did not rotate in the wind and thus stress/mess up the cable.

    such beautiful engineering.

    further, the whole fuselage and wings have a thin piece of wire that runs through them to act sort of like a Farraday cage to protect the radio from the static from the engine.

    and the engine was NOT mounted inline with the center of the plane. It was mounted off-line by 2-3 degrees to correct for the torque of the rotating engine. Pure physics there.

    Plus, did you know that the engine had aluminum crankcase and alu pistons. All in WWI.

    Regards,

    Merton.

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