Joint dioramas

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    bcauchi
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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  bcauchi on Fri Dec 18, 2009 3:57 pm

    Hey guys i think that i have a revell hurricane in my stash and will gladly donate it towards this project. i shall check out what mark it is. I had no plans for building it just yet.

    iCocker
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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  iCocker on Fri Dec 18, 2009 4:51 pm

    Prosit Brian ... will await the living encoklipedia highlighting on the aircarft version!

    Here are some interesting facts of the use of tanks in the Malta airfields according to the War Diary.


    On 9th October a detachment of four "I" tanks and one Light Tank given as from No 4 Troop was sent to Bubakra, one "I" tank was to remain at Luqa for towing crashed aircraft. On the 16th another detachment was sent to Attard with three Cruiser A13 and a Light Tank, this listed as No 2 Troop. On the 27th they exercised with 8th Manchesters.

    A second "I" tank with crew was sent to Luqa from No 4 Troop for towing duties on 16th November. On the 21st an A9 and crew were sent to Ta Kali aerodrome for towing crashed aircraft, they returned that night but on the 26th an A9 and three crew from No 2 Troop were sent back. This broke down on the 30th and was replaced by another.

    2nd January 1943 saw HQ and No 3 Troop move to join the detachment at Bubakra, leaving an A9 behind immobilised. On the 3rd Malta Tanks came under command HQ 1 (Malta) Infantry Brigade apart from No 2 Troop which was under command HQ 2 (Malta) Infantry Brigade. On the 5th an A9 was collected from Verdala Palace by REME and taken to workshops to be fitted with a new engine. 29th January, as part of a skeleton exercise a single Cruiser and a single "I" Tank were used to represent a Troop each with the CO using a Light Tank.

    In a counterattack exercise on 2nd February, HQ used two Light Tanks, No 3 Troop three A9 and No 4 Troop three "I" Tanks. On the 12th an "I" Tank at Luqa was relieved and replaced. Several exercises were held in March, on the 2nd and 3rd one Light and three A9 were used, on the 4th a Light and two A9, 5th and 9th one Light and two A13, 11th a single Light Tank, 12th a Light Tank and two A13 with one unit and a Light and three A9 with another with the same on the 19th. On the 23rd an "I" Tank was returned from REME Workshops and on the 27th an A13 and crew from No 2 Troop returned from duties at Ta Kali aerodrome. 1st April an "I" Tank and driver was sent to REME Workshops. 13th saw an "I" Tank sent to Luqa aerodrome for towing duties. 23rd April, one Valentine Mk III was received from Middle East. 26th April, unit came under HQ Malta Command for administrative purposes and HQ 232 Brigade for operations etc apart from No 2 Troop which was under HQ 234 Brigade.

    3rd May two Valentine Mk II received from Middle East. 11th, an "I" Tank was returned from REME Workshops and an "I" Tank sent from Luqa to REME Workshops. An exercise at Marfa on the 19th-20th used two Light Tanks, three Cruisers and three Valentines, one at Hal Far on the 20th used a Light Tank, an A9 and an "I" Tank. On the 22nd another Valentine III was received from the Middle East. 27th saw an "I" Tank and crew sent to Ta Kali for towing duties. 2nd June a Valentine was displayed at Palace Square, Valetta for the King's Birthday celebrations.

    Valentine,Valletta celebrations of King's Bday ... who guess the tank's nickname will get an award! It's not ADAM for sure ...


    J.Fenech
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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  J.Fenech on Fri Dec 18, 2009 5:16 pm

    Since you are going to do a hurricane, 3 airfields were operational in the hurricane era, Hal Far, Luqa and Ta Qali(Takali), with the latter being the most muddy and mostly bombed airfield I think. Spitfires began to arrive in March 1942, and Hurricanes continued to operate until late May, by which time most of the surviving Hurricanes left for North Africa, leaving the war to the spitfire. Qrendi was opened in Nov 1942, 249sqn being the first to move in and Safi in 1943. Fighters used mainly Hal Far and Takali, leaving Luqa to heavier, larger aircraft.

    J.Fenech
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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  J.Fenech on Fri Dec 18, 2009 5:21 pm

    Ivan, if it is 9th october 1942 the dairy is referring to, hurricanes were gone by that time by about 5 months.

    Ray
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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  Ray on Fri Dec 18, 2009 5:30 pm

    I think it was October 1941 if memory serves me well Embarassed

    Ray affraid

    skyhigh
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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Fri Dec 18, 2009 8:10 pm

    Well well well here ....FJ you imprese me well done with all that inf ,its good at last I have a member not just building models, but memorize its history especially when you built all those Hurricanes and Spits in malta theather markings ...

    Well If you are going for 1/32 Scale yes Revell is the only one that make the Hurricane, but for the spits we had PR spits and that can be done from Mk1 versions ,MkV and MkIX.... As Models We can find Revell/ Hasegawa Mk1 or MkII and for the MkV and MkIX Hasegawa is the choice it depends which era you are going to built..

    iCocker
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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  iCocker on Fri Dec 18, 2009 9:06 pm

    The abstract from were I got the idea is by H.Pugh Lloyd written in Malta at War. The bad weather started late October 1941 and continued throughout Dec and January. As JF hinted the worst effected was Ta Qali. Works had to continuely service taxi-tracks and bogged planes sometimes 7 in a day working like slaves pulling the massive machines with ropes. Ta Qali ended up 2/3 inch deep slush yellow mud and water and ended unusabe for days. Seems also Luqa, and Hal Far were not far behind. Seems concrete, tar and bitumen [boq?] was unavailable and neither tractors and heavy equipment, hence why AFV might have been called.

    Unfortunetly no clue which squadrons were there but what might help was that the Ta Qali airmen were shifted to Hal far due that field was better ... so for the plane experts to find what aircarft and squads were used ... I guess Hurricanes?

    Ivan

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Fri Dec 18, 2009 9:26 pm

    Well here I have a brief history for those interested in Malta campaign and dates..


    First Attack on Malta
    11 Jun 1940 - 31 Dec 1942

    Because of its strategic position between Gibraltar and Alexandria (and Suez Canal beyond that) as well as being between Italy and Libya, the island of Malta was critical for both sides of the conflict. As a result, Malta found itself in the middle of the Mediterranean conflict as soon as Italy entered the war. Although it was no longer the base of the British Mediterranean Fleet (it moved to Alexandria), it was immediately targeted by the Italian aircraft to augment the Italian Navy efforts to disrupt British shipping. The first raid on Malta came a day after Italy declared war on Britain. Little after 0430 on 11 Jun 1940 55 Italian SM79 aircraft were launched from Sicily to attack the three airfields at Malta: Hal Far, Valetta, and Kalafrana. They were escorted by 18 C.200 Saetta aircraft. At this time, Malta's air defense consisted of a radar station and six Sea Gladiator fighters, and not all were in flight condition. Three of the Sea Gladiator aircraft scrambled immediately. Flight Lieutenant George Burges was the first of the three to make contact with the Italian bombers, but he did not intercept them until the first load of bombs were already dropped. He damaged one of the bombers. His fellow pilot later scored another hit on the damaged bomber, but the Italian aircraft managed to return to Sicily. Although the aging biplanes barely fought off the first raid, Malta would be constantly attacked by Italian and German air forces. In order to maintain Malta's ability to defend itself, the British knew they would need to constantly deliver war goods to the island.

    Battle of Calabria
    9 Jul 1940

    On 6 Jul 1940, a heavily escorted Italian convoy heading to supply Libya. Its destination was Benghazi, but attempts were made to confuse Allied intelligence, tricking them to believe that it was heading toward Tripoli. The escorted consisted of two battleships, 8 heavy cruisers, 8 light cruisers, and 20-some destroyers eventually sailed with the convoy.

    At the same time, a British convoy from Alexandria sailed toward Malta, planning to deliver supplies and evacuate civilians. The British escort consisted of 3 battleships, 1 carrier, 5 cruisers, and 16 destroyers.

    On the night of 8 Jul, Italian command deciphered Allied radio signals and learned of the presence of the British convoy. The British also detected the presence of the Italian convoy. To draw the British ships closer to Italian air bases, the Italian ships turned north as they neared each other off Calabria, the "toe" of Italy. Shortly before engagement, technical problems aboard two light cruisers and two destroyers caused them to turn back with additional destroyers for escort. On the same day, Italian aircraft located the British convoy and attacked, hitting Gloucestor's bridge, killing the entire bridge crew, including her captain.

    At noon on 9 Jul 1940 the two convoys were 90 miles apart. Because the slower Royal Sovereign and Malaya could not keep up with the fleet, British Vice Admiral Andrew Cunningham decided that he would only take Warspite with him and chase after the northward-sailing Italian fleet. At 1315, carrier Eagle launched Swordfish torpedo bombers against the Italian cruisers; they met no success. At 1515 that afternoon, at the distance of 21,500m, the ships began to exchange fire as the two groups drew closer together. At 1522, British Admiral John Towey decided that Italian shells were landing too closely and disengaged his cruiser, but the maneuvering did not prevent cruiser Giuseppe Garibaldi's shell from striking cruiser Neptune and begin a fire. By 1530, the firing ceased between the two groups of cruisers in general.

    At 1552, Italian battleship Giulio Cesare moved within 26,400m to Warspite and commenced firing. Battleship Conte di Cavour was told to hold fire to give Giulio Cesare's spotters an easier time; while that might had been accomplished, it also decreased the Italian fleet's firepower in half. One of Giulio Cesare's shells landed long and exploded near destroyers Hereward and Decoy, damaging them. At 1554, the slower British battleship Malaya caught up and joined the battle. After Giulio Cesare fired two near-misses, she was hit on the rear deck by Warspite's 381mm shell. The hit set off anti-aircraft ammunition, forcing half the boilers to shut down as a precaution, and the speed dropped to 18 knots as a result. At this point, Conte di Cavour began to fire. Warspite circled in place to allow Malaya to get closer. At 1601, Italian destroyers made smoke and covered the positions of the battleships beyond as they made retreat toward Messina. The British fleet lacked speed and did not pursue, choosing to return to Gibraltar. Both fleets attempted to make torpedo runs with their destroyers as the two fleets distanced from each other; none of them made any hits.

    At 1440, Italian aircraft attacked the convoy with 126 aircraft and damaged Eagle, Warspite, and Malaya. A group of Italian aircraft attacked the Italian fleet by mistake, but caused no damage.

    The outcome was inconclusive, but both sides claimed victory with worked their respective propaganda machines. Strictly speaking the engagement was more so a small Italian tactical victory for that the Italian convoy was able to successfully reach Libya while the British was turned back, but because of the damage to Giulio Cesare, some consider it a small British victory for that the British ships remained undamaged at the end of the battle.

    The Battle of Calabria was also known as the Battle of Punta Stilo.

    Operation Hurry
    Aug 1940

    Carrier Argus successfully delivered 12 Hurricane fighters to Malta in Aug 1940.

    Operation Hats
    Sep 1940

    In Sep 1940, two convoys, one from Alexandria and the other from Gibraltar, simultaneously sailed for Malta. En route, British carriers launched air strikes against Italian air bases.

    Operation Judgment Convoy
    11 Nov 1940

    A convoy was sent to coincide with the attack on Taranto. The convoy reached Malta successfully due to the fact that the Italian forces were overwhelmed with the British attack. For more details on the attack on Taranto, please see this article.

    Operation White
    17 Nov 1940

    Before the Battle of Taranto, the Italian Navy employed the strategy of Fleet in Being, which made use of its mere presence to scare off British convoys without actually engaging in major combat. After Taranto, however, it realized that British aircraft made this strategy ineffective as the warships were still threatened even in port. As a result, a major shift in direction took place, and the Italian warships actively sortied into the Mediterranean. On the night of 17 Nov 1940, battleships Vittorio Veneto and Giulio Cesare set sail to intercept the British carrier group containing Ark Royal and Argus on Operation White, delivering aircraft to Malta. British air reconnaissance detected the Italian fleet, and the convoy launched the deliverables of 2 Skua and 12 Hurricane aircraft, and turned around for Gibraltar. Miscalculating the range, 9 of the British aircraft crashed into the sea as they ran out of fuel.

    Operation Collar / Battle of Cape Spartivento
    27 Nov 1940

    After the losses as a result of Operation White, Operation Collar was launched later that month in attempt to supply Malta again. The convoy set sail with more warships in escort to prevent Italian interference.

    An Italian fleet centered around battleship Vittorio Veneto set sail to intercept, as expected. The British detected the Italian movement, and the warships intercepted before the Italians closed in on the convoy. At 1145 on 27 Nov 1940, the two forces spotted each other. Admiral James Somerville of the British fleet split his force into two groups. The forward group was let by 5 cruisers, backed up by 2 battleships and 7 destroyers slightly behind them. In the rear, carrier Ark Royal waited to launch Swordfish torpedo bombers as she was escorted by two destroyers and some lighter ships.

    At 1207, to the surprise of the British, the Italian ships suddenly turned about. Unknown to the British, the Italians were ordered to avoid confrontation unless victory would be certain, which led to apparent withdraw even though the two forces were about even in strength. The Italian order to disengage was given too late, however. The British cruisers were already committed to a chase, and by 1222 the two forces were only 23,500m from each other and began to exchange fire. British cruiser Berwick was hit by two 80-in shells, and Italian destroyer was seriously damaged by a shell from cruiser Manchester. By about 1226, the older British battleship Ramilles could not keep up with the formation, falling outside of firing range, and the Italian ships gained an advantage in the number of guns in the battle. At 1230, Vice Admiral Angelo Iachino gave the order to increase speed to 30 knots, confirming the Italian intention to disengage.

    Carrier Ark Royal never got a chance to launch her aircraft by the time the Italians broke from combat.

    This minor naval engagement was later labeled the Battle of Cape Spartivento. It was also known as the Battle of Cape Teulada in Italy.

    Operation Excess
    6 Jan 1941

    On 6 Jan 1941, a convoy left Gibraltar for Malta and Greece escorted by H Force while another convoy sailed from Alexandria for Malta. When the operation ended, the British lost two cruisers and a destroyer, and the Illustrious was damaged by German aircraft and would remain out of commission for several months for repairs.

    Operation Tiger
    May 1941

    A convoy set sail from Gibraltar to Alexandria, while at the same time two small convoys from Egypt to Malta were launched. Carriers Ark Royal and Furious delivered 48 Hurricane aircraft to Malta.

    Operation Tracer
    Jun 1941

    British submarines brought urgent supplies, while carriers Ark Royal, Furious, and Illustrious delivered 48 aircraft, for Malta.

    Operation Substance
    23 Jul 1941

    A convoy of six transports with carrier Ark Royal, battlecruiser Renown, battleship Nelson, several cruisers, and six destroyers in escort was attacked by Sardinia-based Italian aircraft. One cruiser was damaged and one destroyer was sunk, but the transports reached Malta safely.

    Operation Style
    Aug 1941

    A convoy from Gibraltar successfully delivered reinforcements and supplies to Malta, sinking an Italian submarine en route.

    Operation Halberd
    24-26 Sep 1941

    A convoy of 9 merchant ships set sail from Gibraltar to Malta on 24 Sep 1941 with the smaller escort force under the command of Rear Admiral Harold Martin Burrough and the larger escort force (H Force) under James Somerville consisted of carrier Ark Royal, battleships Nelson, Rodney, and Prince of Wales, 5 cruisers, and 18 destroyers. On 26 Sep 1941, an Italian fleet sailed to intercept but did not make contact. On 27 Sep, an Italian torpedo bomber attacked and seriously damaged the battleship Nelson. On 28 Sep, the merchant vessel Imperial Star was attacked and scuttled. The remaining 8 merchant ships arrived at Malta on 28 Sep and delivered 85,000 tons of supplies.

    Sinking of an Italian Convoy
    Nov 1941

    In Nov 1941, British K Force intercepted an Italian convoy off Cape Calabria and sank all 7 transports and both escorting destroyers.

    Operation Perpetual
    10-12 Nov 1941

    During this operation, carriers Ark Royal and Argus delivered Hurricane aircraft from Gibraltar to Malta. While returning to Gibraltar, Ark Royal was torpedoed and damaged by German submarine U-81.

    First Battle of Sirte
    17-19 Dec 1941

    On 16 Dec 1941, Italians sent a convoy code named M42 from Naples for Benghazi to supply Axis troops in North Africa. A mistake in aerial intelligence placed two British battleships in the area, when there were none at British disposal at the time, and as a result the escort force for the convoy was unnecessarily large. Close to the convoy were the battleship Caio Duilio, three light cruisers, and three destroyers. In slight distance, battleships Littorio, Andrea Doria, Giulio Cesare sailed in support with cruisers Trento and Gorizia, and 10 destroyers. In actuality, the British force was much smaller with only 6 light cruisers and 12 destroyers.

    On 17 Dec, an Italian reconnaissance aircraft found a British formation near Sidi Barrani. Again, the aircraft's report mistakenly noted it as a battleship group when the battleship was actually a large tanker in the convoy as a battleship, hence further overestimating British strength in the region. The crew of the aircraft was not entirely to blame -- the British painted on guns on the tanker Breconshire for the very purpose of deceit. Admiral Angelo Iachino, upon hearing the reconnaissance, ordered his fleet the engage. The Italian fleet approached with caution, and the British convoy maneuvered to avoid the hostile ships, so the two groups did not engage in combat until after sunset when German aircraft found and attacked it. Using British anti-aircraft fire as a guide, the Italian fleet closed in and began firing at the distance of 32,000m. Admiral Vian of the British escort fleet laid smoke and fled.

    At the end of the engagement, two British destroyers were damaged. All Italian transports reached their destinations and delivered their cargo.

    It was after the Italians had completed their mission when the British realized the Italians were also escorting a convoy. The British squadron at Malta was dispatched to intercept them on their way back to Italy. On the night of 19 Dec the British squadron sailed into a mine field about one mile off Tripoli. Cruiser Neptune struck four mines and sank, while destroyer Kandahar also struck one and was scuttled the next day. The cruisers Aurora and Penelope were heavily damaged but were able to return to Malta. It dealt critical damage to the Malta-based K Force and was a severe blow to Allied operations in the Mediterranean.

    Actions in Jan 1942

    In Jan 1942, three small British convoys arrive at Malta from Alexandria. One escorting destroyer, Gurkha, was torpedoed and sank.

    Also in the same month, two large Italian convoys got through to North Africa to resupply the German Afrika Korps.

    Operation MF5
    Feb 1942

    In Feb 1942, three transports were sent from Alexandria for Malta. One of them was sunk by Axis aircraft, one was attacked and diverted to Tobruk, and the third was disabled and scuttled.

    Operation Spotter
    Mar 1942

    Carriers Eagle and Argus successfully flew off the first Spitfire aircraft reinforcements for Malta.

    Operation MG1/Second Battle of Sirte
    22 Mar 1942

    From Alexandria, four transports sailed for Malta, escorted by cruisers Cleopatra, Dido, Euryalus, and Carlisle, and 16 destroyers. The convoy was detected and both surface vessels and aircraft were dispatched to intercept. On 22 Mar 1942, the Italian ships made contact with the convoy. The transports continued to sail for Malta, while the cruisers and destroyers laid smoke and charged at the Italian fleet. After an exchange of fire, the two Italian heavy cruisers backed off, but returned to the action again when battleship Littorio and her destroyers came on the scene. At 1830, the British destroyers launched a torpedo attack; all torpedoes missed, and Havock and Kingston were hit by 15-inch shells from Littorio. At 1900, the battle subsided as the sun set. Most of the British escorts turned for Alexandria as their fuel ran low, while those that were damaged continued on to Malta.

    On 23 Mar, German and Italian aircraft continuously attacked the island. Transport Campbell was sunk 20 miles from harbor and oil tanker Breconshire was damaged and anchored outside.

    On 24 Mar, German dive bombers attacked, hitting all three of the remaining transports. By this point, only 5,000 tons of cargo had been unloaded, which meant 21,000 tons of supplies were now beneath the waves.

    This engagement at Malta was also referred to as the Second Battle of Sirte.

    Operation Calendar
    Apr 1942

    50 Spitfire aircraft were delivered by American carrier Wasp, escorted by battlecruiser Renown, cruisers Cairo and Charybdis and six American and British destroyers. Most of these aircraft were later destroyed on the ground by German bombing.

    Operation Bowery and Operation LB
    May 1942

    Operation Bowery brought in 64 Spitfire aircraft with American carrier Wasp and British carrier Eagle. A few days later, Operation LB brought in 16 more with British carrier Eagle.

    Operation Harpoon
    12-15 Jun 1942

    Operation Vigorous
    12-16 Jun 1942

    Launched simultaneously as the "Harpoon" convoy was the "Vigorous" convoy (MW-11) from Haifa, Palestine and Port Said, Egypt. The 11 transports were escorted by British and Australian warships of the 7th Destroyer Flotilla. Off Tobruk, Libya, they were met by Rear Admiral Philip Vian's Force A, which added 7 light cruisers and 17 destroyers to the escort group. The nearly obsolete battleship Centurion, equipped only with anti-aircraft guns, also joined the convoy; while she added some anti-aircraft protection, her role was also to simulate the presence of a battleship.

    This convoy sailed through an area of the Mediterranean Sea between Crete, Greece (occupied by Germany) and North Africa (with Italian and German presence) that the Allies nicknamed "Bomb Alley". They expected, and received, intense air and surface attacks shortly after departing Alexandria, Egypt. Early attacks focused on damaging the cruisers and the transports, but as the convoy sailed on, the destroyers became the main targets for the attackers. On 12 Jun, two of the transports were diverted to Tobruk, one due to combat damage and the other engine trouble; the latter would be attacked en route and would sink. By 14 Jun, casualty figures were at two Allied ships sunk and two damaged. During that evening, British submarines deployed outside of Taranto, Italy detected movement of an Italian force consisted of two battleships, two heavy cruisers, two light cruisers, and destroyers; unbeknownst to the British, this force under the command of Admiral Giuseppe Fioravanzo was equipped with radar supplied by Germany (mounted aboard destroyer Legionario), the first use of radar by the Italian Navy in the war. In the early morning of 15 Jun, the convoy attempted a reversal to throw off potential attacks, but were still met by German E-boats, damaging cruiser HMS Newcastle and sinking destroyer HMS Hasty. At 0700 hours, the convoy turned northwest for Malta again.

    Meanwhile, Royal Air Force aircraft from Malta attacked the Italian port of Taranto in the same morning to provide relief as the convoy neared. Although heavy cruiser Trento was disabled by a torpedo launched by a Beaufort bomber at 0515 hours on 15 Jun, the rest of the Italian fleet still sailed to intercept. British submarine Umbra found the damaged Trento several hours later and sank her at 0910 hours, killing half of her crew.

    Between 0940 and noon on 15 Jun, two more course reversals were ordered, but none of the maneuverings were able to throw off the attackers. South of Crete, cruiser HMS Birmingham was damaged and scuttled, and destroyer HMS Airedale was heavily damaged by German Ju 87 Stuka dive bombers, forcing HMS Aldenham and HMS Hurworth to scuttle her on the next day. In the afternoon, the convoy learned that the sister convoy from Gibraltar, "Harpoon", had reached Malta. At 1800 hours, near misses from German horizontal bombers heavily damaged destroyer HMAS Nestor. In the evening, reluctantly, the convoy turned back for Alexandria as the threat of the Italian fleet loomed larger. The fuel situation also contributed to the decision, as the excessive maneuverings used up a lot of fuel. En route to Alexandria, light cruiser HMS Hermione was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-205 south of Crete in the early hours of 16 Jun. Shortly after, HMAS Nestor would be scuttled at 0530 hours as she was deemed not-repairable after damage sustained from the day before.

    As the Italian fleet retired to Taranto, a RAF Wellington aircraft from Malta torpedoed and damaged battleship Littorio; the Italian battleship was able to sail to port on her own power.

    Operation Pedestal
    9-15 Aug 1942

    On 9 Aug 1942, the Z Force of two battleships, three aircraft carriers, seven cruisers, and 24 destroyers escorted another convoy for Malta. The deliverables consisted of 36 Spitfire aircraft and 14 merchant ships' worth of various supplies. The convoy started from Gibraltar, and was detected by Italian aircraft on 11 Aug. It was decided that one Italian cruiser division was to intercept the convoy, supported by ten submarines and a combined force of Italian and German aircraft.

    On 11 Aug, German submarine U-73 avoided detection of British destroyers and infiltrated the convoy. She launched a torpedo attack on carrier Eagle and sank her. Realizing the operation was now in jeopardy, commander of the escort force Rear Admiral Syfret ordered the Spitfire aircraft destined to Malta to take off from the carrier Furious early; these fighters reached Malta without incident and Furious broke from the convoy and returned to Gibraltar. That evening, Italian submarine Dagabur attacked, but was discovered and destroyed by destroyer Wolverine; Wolverine was damaged in the process, and also broke from the convoy and returned to Gibraltar. At 2000 that night, the Italian air force reached the convoy, damaging the flight deck of the carrier Victorious. From Malta, aircraft were launched to divert further Axis air attacks on the convoy for the remainder of the night.

    On 12 Aug 1942, Italian submarine Cobalto was found and destroyed by ramming. The first air attack of the day proved to be disastrous, with a merchant ship and destroyer Foresight sunk and carrier Indomitable's flight deck damaged. Without an operating flight deck, Indomitable became a liability, and turned back to Gibraltar as well; the convoy was now protected in the air only by land-based aircraft. During the day, the Z Force reached the end point of their escort duty and turned around for Gibraltar, leaving the remaining merchant ships under the protection of several cruisers and destroyers. The evening of 12 Aug saw the successful raid by Italian submarine Axum, sinking cruiser Cairo and damaging the largest oil tanker in the world Ohio and cruiser Nigeria. A follow-up air attack sank two merchant ships. The British seamen were demoralized. Less than an hour later, the convoy sailed into the ambushing Italian submarines Alagi and Bronzo; they damaged the cruiser Kenya and sank two merchant ships.

    During the first hours of 13 Aug, cruiser Manchester and a stunning six merchant ships were sunk by a lone motor boat. As the British convoy limped on toward Malta, the Italian cruiser division of six cruisers and 17 destroyers was now ready to attack. However, German Marshal Albert Kesselring decided that the German aircraft were better poised to finish off the convoy and there was no need to risk the heavy surface ships. As a result, the Italian ships turned back for Messina; en route, British submarine Safari damaged Bolzano and Attendolo. On the night of 13 Aug, one of the German Ju 88 aircraft found and further damaged Ohio; the rest of the German aircraft failed to locate the convoy. The remainder of Pedestal's ships reached Malta on 15 Aug.

    Despite losing one carrier, two cruisers, and 14 merchant ships, the arrival of the Ohio (which was towed into the harbors because of her battle wounds) at Malta brought a significant amount of fuel that allowed the British to continue to operate in Malta.

    Operation Stoneage
    Nov 1942

    A convoy of four transports, escorted by three cruisers and 10 destroyers, sailed from Alexandria to Malta. The cruiser Arethusa was seriously damaged en route, but all transports made it to Malta safely, delivering supplies that were badly needed.

    Operation Portcullis
    Dec 1942

    Four transports arrived from Port Said without loss.

    Conclusion of the Campaign

    As Axis strength dwindled in North Africa, Allied convoys in the Mediterranean became less threatened from Axis interception. As a direct result, the island of Malta began to play the role of an advance attack base. For example, the forthcoming campaign against Sicily and Italy would use Malta extensively.

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  J.Fenech on Sat Dec 19, 2009 3:32 am

    iCocker wrote:The abstract from were I got the idea is by H.Pugh Lloyd written in Malta at War. The bad weather started late October 1941 and continued throughout Dec and January. As JF hinted the worst effected was Ta Qali. Works had to continuely service taxi-tracks and bogged planes sometimes 7 in a day working like slaves pulling the massive machines with ropes. Ta Qali ended up 2/3 inch deep slush yellow mud and water and ended unusabe for days. Seems also Luqa, and Hal Far were not far behind. Seems concrete, tar and bitumen [boq?] was unavailable and neither tractors and heavy equipment, hence why AFV might have been called.

    Unfortunetly no clue which squadrons were there but what might help was that the Ta Qali airmen were shifted to Hal far due that field was better ... so for the plane experts to find what aircarft and squads were used ... I guess Hurricanes?

    Ivan


    If you are going to use this period, that is Oct41 - Jan42, it is going to be interesting. October was relatively a calm period for the the fighter units, but that was about to change. During this month the following units were operational - 249sqn, 126sqn, 185sqn, and the MNFU. In November two more units arrived, 242sqn and 605sqn which were to transit through bound for North Africa, but as it turned out these unit will remain on Malta, as II Fliegerkorps moved to Sicily in december and the heavy fighting was going to begin. Hurricanes will have to go up against the 109Fs of JG53.

    As to other hurricane units, 229sqn came in from North Africa in the end of March 42 with mkIIc. No.261sqn had suffered badly to the hand of the german and italians, but not without a fight as it had its share of shot down enemy aircraft about 100+. The survivors of the sqn were incoporated in No.185sqn when it came to Malta. No.261sqn will eventually reform in the Middle East. No.46sqn arrived on Malta in june 1941, and will later be absorbed in 126sqn

    Squadron codes,

    No.249sqn (GN- )
    No.185sqn (GL- )
    No.126sqn (HA- )
    No.242sqn (LE- )
    No.605sqn (UP- )
    No.229sqn (HB- )


    It is only a matter of choosing a unit, personlly I would choose one from 249,185 and 126sqns during this period. This was still the hurricane era, as spitfires were yet to come. As to what versions of the hurricane were in use, by this time most were mk.II (a/b/c), but there were still the occasional mk.I i think. When the MNFU was formed in July 1941, it was with 8 mkIIc and 4 mkIIbs. Find a good pics of what you want, preferably with a front view (to see or not a trop filter), serial no. and codes (not always applied). Delivery flights of reinforcements were mixed.


    Last edited by J.Fenech on Sat Dec 19, 2009 8:05 am; edited 2 times in total

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  J.Fenech on Sat Dec 19, 2009 3:43 am

    skyhigh wrote:Well well well here ....FJ you imprese me well done with all that inf ,its good at last I have a member not just building models, but memorize its history especially when you built all those Hurricanes and Spits in malta theather markings ...

    Well If you are going for 1/32 Scale yes Revell is the only one that make the Hurricane, but for the spits we had PR spits and that can be done from Mk1 versions ,MkV and MkIX.... As Models We can find Revell/ Hasegawa Mk1 or MkII and for the MkV and MkIX Hasegawa is the choice it depends which era you are going to built..


    Thanks Marco. Even hurricanes were operated in PR role. No.69sqn operated 4 hurricanes in this role. One was V7101, a stripped down PR hurricane I, painted in overall blue, except the tail for some reason.

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  iCocker on Sat Dec 19, 2009 9:21 am

    So we have all the historical background and the scene, what might be interesting we team up and spend an afternoon at the archives of the Aviation Museum and see what might come out, especially we can find the right candidate for the scene.

    For the time being wjat might be interesting is to find photos could be other sources and different theatres of aircraft being pulled, especially makeshift as the scene we need to depict. It is interesting from the text I have read that seems the gang operating these pull outs were using ropes as if working in a harbour [probably were guys from that field of work 'burdnara']. So my question is how are you to tie up a fragile machine with ropes and maybe also attached to AFVs, I do not guess from only the undercarriage?

    So if any might find something of the sort shall be essential for our project dio ... Pull Out, Winter 1941
    So to top up everything the ingrediants shall be a Matilda [AFV], a Hurricane, a pilot and soldiers and labours making a pull out, MINIart have ideal candidates for this with little conversions we can utilis this idea more ... dress codes shall be winter uniforms and mud and water [for Olly to enjoy!]




    The gang and soldiers, We might also add some colour with the Blaupunkts [German [DAK] POWs with uniform and just a blue circle to act as recognition]


    url=http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=52&u=14151645][/url]

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 1:43 pm

    Ivan and Ray this photo state November 1941

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 2:26 pm

    some more usefull material :cheers:

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:09 pm


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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:12 pm


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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  Ray on Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:33 pm

    WoW what a WEALTH of INFO we have here Twisted Evil

    Marco, while documentation per se is useful and imperative re Historicity, I for one ENJOY the PICS MUCH MORE and I confess that I WILL NOT READ ALL THAT USEFUL TEXT YOU POSTED Laughing

    Ok so we have established the period of the Hurricane MKII.

    So in SIMPLE and FEASABLE terms this whole dio should preferably depict a Hurricane MKII (Squadron etc etc we choose from the list) being pulled by a Bren Gun Carrier (this should pose a handsome nameplate for the dio) given the relative small size of the Bren Carrier attempting to pull the cumbersome and aggresive Hurricane tank buster pale and we'll name it "Mission Implausable" Malta 1941 with some 7 or 9 ground crew all in action so we'll breathe life and movement in it........also maybe we can include a Maltese contractor biz-ziemel u l-karettun either repairing or looking at the whole operation Cool

    How about naming it "Mission Implausable" Malta 1941?

    Guys I STAND UP FOR CORRECTION AS ALWAYS ON EVERYTHING I'VE SAID AND SUGGESTED so all the above was to INSTIGATE AND PROVOKE IDEAS pale Embarassed

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:55 pm

    Ray thats why I sad for those interested in Malta campaign...at least if somebody whant's something he find it hehe .. but here we are a free country and everybody have he's guess..

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  iCocker on Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:57 pm

    Nice one Ray and Marco what a wealth of info you have gethered in those void years without modelling!

    Though a Bren Carrier sound nice, it is a rather complex project as what is available is a mkII and we need to change to a mkI [stand to be correct if I am not mixing things] as that version was available in Malta. So not that this cannot be done as a conversion is available by Resicast ... so might a Matilda will be an 'easier' solution ... but again this is up to final desitions to see the overall balance of the dio, which again as Ray pointed a beast like a Hurricane being 'helped out' by a punitive Bren looks cool ...

    So first thing we should strat with is at lesat having a 1'32 Hurricane in hand to judge the size and balance it out ...

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  J.Fenech on Sat Dec 19, 2009 5:59 pm

    emm... just a little bit of a little correction Rolling Eyes , no tank busting hurricanes on malta. That would be a mk.IId, armed with a Vicker s gun x 2 which were 40mm I think + 2 x .303 loaded with tracer and operated in North Africa.

    I think that it is a great set up, and incorporating something that is maltese will give it a personality.

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:07 pm

    By the way Ray Joseph.. escuse me if I'm a bit...Joe already have a half finished 32nd Hurricane at your father showcase, if I'm not mistaken it was in third shelve at the back ,it could be yousfull ....... cheers

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:08 pm

    Yes FJ as I sad the one have Joseph is a MK1 cheers

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  Ray on Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:24 pm

    J.Fenech wrote:emm... just a little bit of a little correction Rolling Eyes , no tank busting hurricanes on malta. That would be a mk.IId, armed with a Vicker s gun x 2 which were 40mm I think + 2 x .303 loaded with tracer and operated in North Africa.

    I think that it is a great set up, and incorporating something that is maltese will give it a personality.

    Sure Joseph PLEASE CORRECT me ama is NEEDED cheers

    My mistake as I meant tal-kanuni Sad not tal-pods ta taht il-kanuni lol! but for me they are both Tank Busters Sad ikkumpatuni Sad

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  Ray on Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:25 pm

    skyhigh wrote:By the way Ray Joseph.. escuse me if I'm a bit...Joe already have a half finished 32nd Hurricane at your father showcase, if I'm not mistaken it was in third shelve at the back ,it could be yousfull ....... cheers

    Le Marco ta ma servietekx tajjeb il-memorja did-darba lol!

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  skyhigh on Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:29 pm

    Mela hadu ghandu id dar , xsar minnu il mudel kien f stat avanzat... cheers

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    Re: Joint dioramas

    Post  Ray on Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:38 pm

    skyhigh wrote:Mela hadu ghandu id dar , xsar minnu il mudel kien f stat avanzat... cheers

    Nahseb li qed TOHLOM ta Marco Sad

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